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social, health, political imagery through the lens of George J Huba PhD © 2012-2017

I looked at this application when it first came out a couple of years ago.

It has improved significantly.

This is easier to use than my favorite program iMindMap. It is also a lot less expensive.

[Do not confuse this app with Xmind 8, which is the more complete but harder to use version. Xmind 8 is much more expensive. Xmind ZEN produces more attractive maps and works MUCH better on small screens (mobile phone, pads).]

I will continue to use iMindMap 11 because of its status as the very best mind mapping app and I use all of its features. If you do not need all of the fancy options, this is a very good program for a beginner (and expert).

Click on the mind map to expand it.

Xmind ZEN

The “data” of mind maps are ideas. The map itself is a tool to support the manipulation and process of idea processing, idea communication, and idea use. The map organizes ideas and provides a means of showing their places within a hierarchical display. New theories or applications or insights can result from placing ideas into the mind mapping tool.

Come up some ideas by yourself or in a brainstorming group or by examing the previous ideas of others through reading books and research journals and interviewing observers of the idea development or use. Take the ideas you generate and collect and put them into the form of a mind map, whether computer-assisted or hand drawn.

Then the magic happens and you see how all of the ideas relate to one another.

The mind map below illustrates how a mind map helps to explore and understand ideas.

Click on the mind map to expand its size.

How Mind Mapping Supports Better Idea Processing, Ideal Communication, and Idea Use

I have been writing a lot on this blog about apathy during the past months. It has been an increasing annoyance and in some ways debilitating symptom. Where is the off switch? I’ve been looking for it for a long time. I cannot find a personal way within my control to turn apathy on and off, even though I do cycle through periods of greater and less apathy all week, often during the same day.

Help.

A mind map shown below discusses my dilemma. Click on the image to expand it.

my brain with dementia apathy condition

 

Click here for other posts on apathy.

It’s the elephant in the room.

elephant small

This is my review of the iMindMap application, Version 11. Since I started reviewing programs for creating mind maps, I have always rated iMindMap as the best of the lot. I have further gone on to say that iMindMap is the best application I own for promoting, improving, motivating, and perfecting visual thinking. With this version, iMindMap continues to evolve while it retains its position as the leader in mind mapping software.

In a way, iMindMap is no longer a mind mapping program in a narrow way. Rather it is the very best program for creating mind maps of any I have ever used. But, in addition to being the best mind mapping program, it contains 6 additional integrated modules that make it into the best integrated visual thinking product on the market.

What is a VIsual THinking ENvironment (VITHEN)? Click here to find out.

The most important way that iMindMap transcends a traditional mind map is that the tools provided for mind mapping almost automatically push you into thinking about your topic in a more sophisticated and complete way. It promotes better classifications of ideas, priorities, impact, outcomes, mediating steps, and theories in a way that is so intuitive it is almost like magic. That is, what you know about mind mapping and how to use it effectively, will automatically “in the background” evolve to an even higher level of visual thinking.

The iMindMap program includes a total of 7 interrelated modules that can be used in combination to understand ideas and produce documents that easily communicate your findings. The iMindMap program also includes dozens of tools and techniques that extend the usefulness of the programs.

While the Mind Map module is the central focus and will be the entry point for almost all, other modules supplement input, idea presentation, and specialized applications. It is the overall interaction of these modules that create the thinking environment.

My position is that mind maps are a powerful tool for creating, clarifying, and presenting THOUGHTS. So, I’ve always presented my reviews as mind maps in the past. I continue that tradition here.

Please click on the image to increase its size and see a classification and evaluation of the overall thinking environment including the best mind mapping module available.

This program is a brilliantly conceived thinking system and environment. While the app will continue to evolve over time as it has annually since the beginning of the century through tweaks to current procedures and new breakthroughs, iMindMap as it currently exists is the premier product for supporting innovative and creative thinking and communication.

Several more points.

  1. I strongly believe that the iMindMap program will help promote better quality thinking for most of those of all ages over 12.
  2. I also strongly believe that mind maps and visual thinking environments will be extremely useful for at least some individuals with declining cognitive skills, especially if they start mind mapping before the onset of cognitive decline or during early stages. I base that conclusion on my own experience in using this program and others to extend the period of minimal cognitive decline that occurs during a neurological disease, as a consequence of trauma, or other myriad problems. I have neurological disease and dementia.
  3. When I first started mind mapping using iMindMap, I was in an early-mid stage of dementia. My early reviews of the program (more than 5 years ago) took me approximately 2-4 hours to mind map and write the accompanying text. In later years, it took more time over more days. I spent at least 8-12 hours working on the mind map here and writing this review over more than a month. The production of the review was slowed down by my own feelings of not having energy and feeling apathy to various degrees. BUT, I was still able to produce a full review of comparable quality to my own reviews of the past after so many years have passed. That is a better outcome than I had expected when I started in 2010. All of the blog posts I have made and all of the mind maps I have developed over the years occurred when I was in cognitive decline and all are on this blog site. The timeline on the left of each web page will allow you to compare the mind maps I could produce years ago with those I now produce. All current mind maps since July 2018 were developed with iMindMap 11.
  4. Over the years I have used virtually all of the competing mind map products both on the Mac and on an iPad. I could not have developed my own mind maps with the other programs and achieved the same outcomes.
  5. While everybody hopes that the software they need to use is provided for free, iMindMap is far beyond any free or low-cost software. It is also as suitable a way to learn mind mapping for the first time as it is as a professional tool. I see the programs current pricing as appropriate for the high value of the thinking environment.
  6. This review used the Mac version of iMindMap 11.

What I have been achieving with mind maps during cognitive decline? Click here for more information.

To access all of my prior reviews of iMindMap (since Version 3), click here.

 

Now that’s a cryptic title for a blog post, isn’t it?

When you move into later stages in dementia, there are some additional challenges to deal with.

  • Apathy (A) like you have never felt apathy before.
  • Anxiety Avoidance (A+A) where the primary experience is often trying to stay away from events, people, and situations that cause you anxiety, to a large part because the experience of anxiety gets harder and harder to cope with.
  • The Bursting Bubble (B+B) phenomenon wherein strategies you have used successfully in earlier stages of dementia to maintain quality of life no longer work so well.
  • Confusion (C) as a daily part of everything you do increases 10-fold.
  • Communication (C) becomes less automatic, more idiosyncratic to you, much harder because words disappear on the way in and on the way out, slower, ambiguous, more frustrating to you and those you are communicating with, and possibly without any memory of things you said 5 minutes, 5 hours, 5 days, or last Thanksgiving.
  • A(A+A)(B+B)CC

Sounds like a recipe for disaster to me unless you take active (and hard) steps to maintain quality of life under different conditions you have encountered before.

The following mind map shows the problems involved with moving into later stages of dementia and some solutions that might work for you. Skills and techniques you learned at early and middle stages of dementia will be helpful but not sufficient to fully deal with the continuing challenges of maintaining quality of life.

Can it be done? Yes. Is it easy without a plan? No. Does a plan help? Yes.

Here are some explanations of what might be happening to you (or an individual under your care) as dementia progresses. Click on the image to expand it.

A few solutions for each problem are also suggested. Note that these are general suggestions and NOT medical or psychological advice. For more help, see your healthcare provider(s).

The A(A+A)(B+B)CCs of Later Stages in Dementia

 

 

Exclusive news flash … the contents of an iTunes playlist on Putin’s iPhone.

Since most Americans, including the one residing in the White House, know little about Russia’s history, here is a tutorial that can be played on Fox News so that POTUS will see it. The tutorial is easy to understand while eating Big Macs and does not require reading skills beyond those acquired by the age of 10.

A lot of Americans think Paul McCartney wrote this new Russian National Anthem. They are mistaken, but the Beatles song is a lot more catchy than that of the USSR. Putin loves it.

Russian National Anthem as revised under the regime of Vladimir Putin. An alternate Russian national anthem was used during the regime of Boris Yeltsin; Putin restored the original USSR national anthem in 2000 with lyric edits after replacing Democracy with Oligarchy.

I have no idea why Youtube has this labeled as the German Anthem.

Vladimir Putin sings the national anthem surrounded by 130,000 disenfranchised citizens of Russia. At least he seems to be able to sing his national anthem better than Roseanne Barr can sing ours.

Hopefully, after November 6, 2018, the anthem of the Soviet Union (AKA Russia) with edited lyrics will not replace the Star Spangled Banner.

As a point of comparison to Putin, click here to see some infamous performance of the USA national anthem.

November 6, 2018 ===> VOTE AGAINST RUSSIAN TROLLS

 

A few years ago, I introduced the term VIsual THinking ENvironment to describe applications that provide a number of visual thinking tools like mind maps, concept maps, flow charts, diagramming, statistical graphics, and visual representations of models, theories, and new knowledge in an integrated way within a single application.

As I used and experimented with new (or newly revised) mind mapping applications every year, I noticed how they were evolving from mind mapping to thinking environments by continuing to implement new and easier ways to process diagrams, figures, photography, sketches, doodles, and logic models together and build integration among tools that permit input visualization and visual output.

The best (and right now the only) evolving mind mapping application to include related new or adapted visual information processing methods is iMindMap 11. It is the only application that provides a well-conceived suite of techniques to form a Visual Thinking Environment (VITHEN). I believe that iMindMap should be rated A++ as a mind mapping program and A as an evolving VITHEN. I fully expect the entire iMindMap 11 suite to be as useful and developed as the mind mapping module within an iteration or three.

So, what is a VITHEN? The following mind map (created in iMindMap 11) incorporates my definition. A fully developed VITHEN not only will produce mind maps and other graphics but most importantly encourages intelligent use in model and theory building and optimizing creativity and effective knowledge development and presentation.

Click on the image to expand it.

What is a Visual Thinking Environment or VITHEN

The next posts include a “formal review” of iMindMap 11, examples of advanced mind maps (which I characterize as MIND MODELS), and an analysis of advantages of a VIsual THinking ENvironment over traditional mind mapping and other graphic thinking tools.

Click here for a full review of iMindMap, Version 11.
Review posted 10-28-18.

Want your dementia care and final life experiences to be good ones? Take a series of “final stands” where you continue to express what you want. Your friends, family members, caregivers, and healthcare providers cannot read your mind. Try to communicate with them through written words, conversations, or visual diagrams.

Before dementia becomes too advanced you need to make some decisions about how you wish to be treated as your cognitive, emotional, and social skills get worse. And you need to make sure that those who care for you, help you, and are important parts of your life know what you want.

I’ve shown a few topics you might want to consider along with your family, friends, caregivers, and healthcare providers in the mind model (map) below.

Click on the image to expand it.

Do your homework and express what you hope to experience and achieve in the final stages of your dementia. Even as dementia causes increasing problems, you can still enjoy life and lead one of high quality.

Plan, enjoy, communicate, live a high quality of end-of-life experiences, and work to achieve your goals with others. Stay as independent as you can, be nice, cooperate, negotiate, and plan.

 

Early Friday morning Hurricane Florence is going right over my house. The predicted storm center path this for Category 4 hurricane (150 mph) is directly over my town near Raleigh, North Carolina. Expected rainfall is between 10 and 20 inches. Some areas will get 48 inches.

About one year ago, Hurricane Maria went over Puerto Rico, a part of the United States. All the lights went out. All of them. Most of the island was destroyed. And there was no fresh, safe water.

A few days after the storm President Trump announced that 65 people had died. The US government and especially President Trump still cites that number as evidence he does “the best job in the history of the United States” in disaster relief.

Independent studies by two major university Departments of Public Health have shown that 3,000 US citizens in Puerto Rico died. One year later (an hour ago), President Trump continues to tweet that his relief efforts in Puerto Rico were about perfect. The statistics of that relief effort shows that the aftermath of Hurricane Maria was one of the most incompetent relief efforts in USA history.

Just watch the video. And consider that parts of Puerto Rico do not have drinkable water or electricity after a year. And people were drinking drain water from a nuclear waste site for months in Puerto Rico.

I know I will be OK. President Trump says so.

[This morning, the computer predicted path models for the eye of the storm have been revised. The hurricane might go somewhat south of my home, although the path is still quite unpredictable. But there is no victory in that. The new predicted path has the storm going over two major US cities: Atlanta, Georgia, and Charlotte, North Carolina. Death tolls could be event high if the path changes.]

I know I will be OK. President Trump says so.

Trump

I know I will be OK. President Trump says so.

Trump

 

Trumpgate is now running at full speed.

Will Trump EVER stop tweeting?

Will Trump EVER stop lying on Fox TV?

Will even one of the senior Republican elected officials in the United States come out and state how dire the situation is?

Will even one of the senior officials in the religious organization supporting Trump finally come out and state that Trump’s behavior has been immoral?

Where’s the org chart for the Trump crime family?

Where’s the org chart for the Putin crime family? How are the two families interlinked?

Which of the positions in the Trump administration are filled by Russian spies?

When will the overall US Government take the US nuclear codes away from Trump?

by George J Huba PhD (Psychology)

Have dementia? It makes no sense to obsessively ruminate about what you have lost.

It makes a lot of sense to focus on now and then try to maximize your quality of life.

Focus not on what you lost but rather on what you have left and how to maximize how you can have the best quality of life possible. That’s how a deal with cognitive decline.

As dementia has progressed for me, apathy has become a bigger concern as the disease progresses.

Something needs to be done now? Chill dude.

Ask someone else to do something to help you? Happens more and more each day.

Just don’t care about deadlines? Yup.

You need to try to deal with apathy early and later in the course of dementia.

Apathy is a trap.

If you become apathetic, you anger your family and friends and others who can help you.

If you become apathetic, you can miss many important and enjoyable parts of life.

If you become apathetic, you can feel helpless and hopeless.

If you become apathetic, your remaining life can be depressing and limited.

If you become apathetic, your quality of life and that of your family and friends can be adversely affected.

Click the mind map below to expand its size.

dementia? now deal with ...

by George J Huba PhD (Psychologist)

Dementia is not just MEMORY LOSS. In fact, certain manifestations of dementia do not involve significant memory loss.

Virtually all forms of dementia include significant psychiatric symptoms. I certainly experience them.

If your doctor is not prescribing psychiatric medications for depression, anxiety, and anger ask why not.

If psychiatric medications you have been prescribed are not working, ask your doctor, why and if it might be useful to consult with a psychiatric medicine specialist, especially one for those with the brain changes of someone with dementia.

A mind map of some of the issues. Click the image to expand it.

Medications for Anger and Depression During Dementia

by George J Huba PhD (Psychology)

This weekend the American Psychological Association is meeting in San Francisco. While certainly not exclusively so, the meeting tends to be dedicated to the presentation of fairly trivial and limited scope, poorly designed research studies.

Psychology should be embarrassed that the focus of the meeting is not developing new and better ways of addressing psychological problems. For instance, I have dementia. So do many millions of people worldwide. At this psychological meeting, there is little focus on actually improving the lives of persons with dementia. The same is true for many other psychological disorders.

How has psychology failed persons with dementia? The following mind map presents my assessment of the situation.

Why does psychology fail persons with dementia? I believe it is because the field wants to pretend it is a science of the rigor of biology and physics, rather than focusing on becoming an evidence-based way of developing better ways of patient assessment, screening, treatment, and communication. What a waste. And remember that I am a person with degenerative cognitive and behavioral disease and I get it. Shame on psychology.

Click the image to expand it.

By George J Huba PhD (Psychology)

Several times over the past six years, I have written similar posts suggesting strategies for minimizing the symptoms of dementia.

This is my current scorecard and suggestions about how to deal with the symptoms of the disease.

This is a totally new effort (I did not go back and look at the prior posts on this topic). If you want to know what I felt about my own dementia at various times since 2012, you can go back and look at my prior posts. To do so, on the left of any of my blog pages you can click on the month and year and see all of the posts from that time period. Alternately, in the search box, you can type in some keywords and see a chronologically-ordered list of my posts on that topic.

Here is a mind map of some strategies for minimizing the symptoms and effects of your dementia (or that of a person with dementia under your care).

Click on the image to expand it.

 

 

#dementia #MindMap @DrHubaEvaluator #GeorgeHuba

 

 

by George J Huba PhD (Psychology)

Dementia is a time that gets extremely complicated for a person with dementia and their spouse, family, friends, new social acquaintances, healthcare providers, and caregivers.

Probably the biggest issue is that those who interact with the person with dementia expect the PWD to communicate in a way that is diminished but still like the way a typical person without dementia communicates just now at a lower level.

It is difficult to communicate with a person with dementia because their own experience of communications is now shaped by the brain changes and other symptoms of dementia. What about your Mom who no longer smiles when you say something she has always liked or when you bring her the pistachio ice cream she has always loved? Ever consider the possibility that she thinks she is smiling but has no control over nonverbal communication such as her smile. Brain damage of various types can cause the loss of nonverbal communication abilities or control of facial muscles.

Why does your friend always get overwhelmed and say something stupid when there are lots of other people around? Perhaps they can’t focus on what you are saying because there is so much noise and motion from distracting sources?

Ever wonder why your friend with dementia comes back with an answer to a question five minutes after you asked the question? Brain changes and damage during dementia may make it hard to retrieve information or think and a loss of a sense of time may mean your friend keeps working on answering the question long after the conversation has moved on.

In dementia, a daydream may be as vivid as something in the real world, and just as distracting. In dementia, you can’t deal with too much information because it distracts you and can’t “fill in the blank spaces” if you receive too little because your “executive functioning” has been destroyed. You tend to get anxious during a conversation not only from unpleasant topics but also from worrying so much about missing a word or forgetting a name or misinterpreting a suggestion as hostile when it was just a normal joke.

The physical and psychological consequences of dementia combine to make it seem that a person with dementia is speaking a different language. They are.

And yes, those 20 or more pills the person with dementia may take daily can affect the ability to speak clearly, pay attention, be sleepy, look like they are bored when they are not, or become even more anxious.

Additional thoughts are arranged on the mind map below.

Click on the image to expand it.

Always try to remember that the person with dementia is often not disinterested or misunderstanding you or too tired to think or extremely distracted in what you think is a peaceful environment.

And if you are a person with dementia, remember that your friend is not trying to mislead you or express hostility and disapproval. They are not trying to trick you or harm you or pick a fight. You might not remember a conversation your caregiver says you had 10 minutes ago, so get over it and trust the other person. Nobody is criticizing you as a person because you can no longer tie your shoelaces or your necktie.

All parties in a conversation with a person who has dementia need to realize that the “rules” for the social encounter have changed because of the disease. Both persons with dementia and their families and friends and caregivers need to realize that is just as hard for all parties to figure out this new “language of dementia.” But it can be done and when mastered can liberate everyone to some degree.

Learn to laugh and smile and enjoy the company of each other again. The positive emotions are still there but they may have to be expressed in different ways. Learn how to express oneself when one or more parties has dementia. It’s worth the time. For everyone.

 

what makes conversation difficult for a person with dementia

 

#mindmap #mindmapping #dementia #Alzheimers @DrHubaEvaluator

By George J Huba PhD (Psychology)

After working hard (or some would say, “struggling) to continue having a good life with dementia, many (including me) find they must eventually come to the final obstacle of almost debilitating apathy and hurdle over it. It is very hard to commit the energy and time to fight back against the apathy which naturally results from knowing you will have to keep working so hard at fighting back for the rest of your life.

Take a deep breath. You can do it and then do it again tomorrow. Do remember that all of us who deal with dementia face the same general set of obstacles every day. And maintaining a “normal” or typical lifestyle is well worth it.

A mind map showing the major issues. Click on the image to expand its size.

Dementia Hurdle

By George J Huba PhD (Psychology)

As part of its Healthiest Communities initiative, the Aetna Foundation recently hosted a panel discussion on improving community health in order to serve individuals and residents with programs that could result in better health. The panel was broadcast on Facebook Live. A video copy of the event can be accessed HERE.

The panelists include:

  • Dr. Garth Graham, President, Aetna Foundation
  • Lauren Singer, Environmental Advocate and Zero Waste Blogger/Author of TrashIs4Tossers
  • Dr. Pedro Noguera, Distinguished Professor of Education, UCLA
  • Jane Sarasohn-Kahn, Health Economist and Founder of the strategic health consultancy THINK-Health

Each of the participants brings unique expertise in trying to understand and enhance service systems as it relates to their respective fields, including public health, education, and community resources and environment. The panelists’ diverse professional training and experiences also brought different viewpoints and ways of interpreting what they observe and understand about community health.

I found the panel to be a very valuable one – full of ideas, suggestions, experiences and planning topics for those who want to intervene to make their communities more responsive to local needs and better able to promote health among their residents.

In order to put the process of community change into context, I watched the video of the panel and prepared two mind maps to show major themes that were discussed. In case you have not read a mind map before it is a fairly easy thing to do. Start at the big graphic in the center and then follow each branch to its end to see a major idea unfold. Mind maps are often used to present complicated relationships ideas in a visual form that is relatively easy to understand and which promotes better information retention and analysis.

The first mind map shows a summary of some general steps and issues important in developing a plan for a community to change some of its services and procedures to support healthy behaviors and effective treatment and intervention.

Please click the mind map to increase its size.

This second mind map shows detailed steps that can be taken in order to implement system change. While the process seems complicated it really is a series of “baby steps” designed to allow community members and organizations feel RESPONSIBLE and EMPOWERED.

Please click the image to increase its size.

Systems change in communities is very hard because many traditional departments (of health, social care, law enforcement, mental health, housing, and supplying food) need to be involved. Many community members wish to help but not if a treatment facility or homeless shelter or parole center is located near their homes. Many professionals and workers at County service facilities want to help and increase services but they are already over-worked and largely underpaid. Creative solutions are needed.

I collaborated with the Aetna Foundation to share their work and research on community health tied to my own expertise in working with county-wide service systems dealing with drug abuse, mental illness, and issues of service access for disenfranchised individuals. These include: poor/homeless individuals, drug abusers (often addicted to heroin, amphetamines, cocaine, and other drugs), those involved in the criminal justice system, street sex workers, extremely physically ill individuals, those diagnosed with a number of behavioral and mental problems, as well as those incapable of accessing services themselves. Over several decades Dr. Lisa Melchior of The Measurement Group and I developed services for the poorest and most fragile members of our society. Dr. Melchior continues our work. 

Lessons Learned

Here are a few key lessons from the Facebook Live video and the broader Healthiest Communities research.

  • Building a healthier community is a very complicated process that involves hundreds (if not, thousands) of agency and individual stakeholders representing a large number of constituencies. Short video conferences such as the one summarized here can prove to be extremely valuable resources for many groups focusing on systems changes. A website featuring video presentations, townhall meetings, and discussions will prove invaluable for many U.S communities throughout the country look better and will help them become better and more efficient by learning “the secrets” of building successful change processes from others who have attempted such changes earlier.
  • Most communities that wish to develop and support change processes usually start with a “needs assessment” of where the community has already built important processes of developing and maintaining services and where the community would benefit from new efforts. A comprehensive database containing concise and valid rankings and research conducted by the Aetna Foundation and US News provides each county a “free needs assessment” or comparison of the community to its peer communities. Rather than requiring an investment of additional resources into expensive analyses of unmet needs, the presence of a mature and valid dataset will permit communities to very quickly review needs established in the existing work and then focus their own efforts and resources on developing plans for addressing the largest needs of the community.

This morning while I was working on Twitter I looked at the bios of various followers of mine in order to see who they were and what they were doing.

One of the best bios I have seen on Twitter is that of Dr Sukant Khurana. His twitter (@sukant_khurana) and blog http://www.BrainArt.com are highly recommended.

I suspected that Dr Khurana might appreciate seeing how his bio could be turned into a mind map by a person with dementia (me) who is using visual thinking methods to continue to have a good life. Dr Khurana, your bio, twitter, and blog are inspiring.

 

the ticket to a good life (adapted from the twitter bio of @sukant_khurana)

It just takes a little time every day to learn and use advanced ways of organizing your thoughts and experiences.

It costs a few cents a day over a lifetime.

It builds cognitive reserve.

It potentially builds a mind more able to deal with the challenges of cognitive impairment and dementia.

Why not?

Click on the image to expand it.

 

The Veterans Healthcare System is the most important one we have in the USA.

VA

One thing that all of the cable news networks and newspapers agree on is that issues of veterans’ health are ones on which all members of Congress seek to achieve a consensus. An interpretation of this that I have heard from the TV pundits is that all members of Congress, whether veterans or not themselves, respect those who risked their lives to protect the United States and police the world. Another interpretation I have heard is that all members of Congress need to face constituents who value service in the military and would not vote for a potential member of Congress who does not protect those rights. I prefer the first interpretation, although I would also accept the second. Veterans have earned lifetime healthcare services and those services should be the very best that the medical and social services can provide.

I was very happy to see the strong reaction of Congress to the poor candidate nominated recently to head the Veteran’s Administration. A doctor who has managed a staff of 70 healthcare providers is probably inadequately prepared to run a large federal agency with hundreds of thousands of employees, 9 million patients, facilities across the US, and many political entanglements. Just because you are the personal physician of the US presidents and praise the current president’s health in spite of his all-fast-food diet, borderline obesity, and behavior that indicates high levels of stress does not mean that you should be rewarded with a job in charge of the quality of the healthcare of 9 million veterans. And no doctor who hands out medications on airplanes without prescriptions or having personally met with the recipient (patient) and is accused of inappropriate interpersonal behaviors is deserving of being trusted with the health of our veterans.

For once, Republicans and Democrats agree that the candidate was not qualified to head the Veterans Administration. And they achieved this conclusion by consensus.

So the nominee did the right thing and withdrew from his candidacy after a lot of pressure from the White House.

188_VVNBX2ZsYWctc3RhdGVzVVNBX2J3.jpg

Wouldn’t you like to see our elected representatives act with similar wisdom and common sense every time they make a decision? CONSENSUS!

Tinkerbell thinks so.

tbell

And I am wishing upon a star.