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social, health, political imagery through the lens of George J Huba PhD © 2012-2019

Think about entering the healthcare system as a patient. You get handed 5 pages of tiny font sheets to fill in with your address, person paying the bills, the medical history of yourself and two generations back every time you go in, You scribble out answers into tiny boxes and hand the forms back. Then they give you 3 small-font pages of legal disclaimers and conditions to read and approve.

Next a nurse takes you aside for a blood pressure reading, a weight assessment, and various other information. He scribbles all of the resuolts into a chart.

Next up the doctor enters. She scans all of the paper you filled out and what the nurse wrote down, and then starts asking you questions in a shotgun approach. When you comment that the answer is still what you wrote down 5 minutes earlier, she is not impressed.

Later the doctor gives you instructions. She goes fast but alo types the suggestions into an EMR (electronic medical record). You may lose the form (common with the cognitive diagnoses I have), not understand everything in the report, and not be able to read 2 point text. but at least you can recover what she wrote.

Don’t they always say a picture is worth 1,000 words? Don’t most people agree with that statement?

For the current aging birth cohort (boomers), images are a way of life. Photos were available when we were born and financially accessible to most by the mid-1960s. The number of pictures increased in newspapers and later on the Internet over the past 50 years. Immediate images and videos from the ubiquitous smartphones have been available to the majority of world-wide families for the past 5 years.

Home black and white television sets became very common in the 1950s and color televisions in the late 1960s.. By the 1990 many US homes had more than one television set. In the 2000s screen (flat panel) sizes at least doubled in size in most homes. 700 channels and 3 TV sets and and nothing on.

We all use images constantly and reading text is going down. We primarily get our news from pictures on the Internet, in print media, and shared with friends or on social media. Pictures are used to influence our attitudes, behaviors, preferences, and to sell us products.

I have been working hard at creating and using images in my own healthcare for the past 9 years after I was diagnosed with a progressive neurocognitive disorder.

About six months ago I had a PET scan of my brain as well as my fourth MRI since 2010. I now have two neurologists. The secondary one (a cognitive neurologist who ordered the scans) emailed me a one page written report wit the results. No images were shown on that report. At my following appointment she discussed the report with me. She commented that there were no images to see. I then asked her if she was going to correct the conceptual typo in the report. In the first summary paragraph of the report it said that my PET scan was normal; the remaining two-thirds of the report gave numbers that indicated portions of my brain were not functioning well. Then the first paragraph was repeated at the end but this time the summary was identical in all but one word which said that my scans indicated significant problems. The doctor sent an email to medical transcription while I was there pointing out the problem.

I asked to see the scan and was told that there was nothing for me to see. I was more than a little surprised by that (well a lot surprised!). I had thought that it would be cool to see which parts of my brain were goners and which were lighting up.

A month later I saw my primary neurologist who has been in charge of my care for more than 9 years. I asked her if she had read the report on my PET scan and last MRI. I explained that I was really surprised that the other neurologist told me that there was nothing for me to see. So she then went to her large clinical display, called up my file and showed me sequential MRI and PET scans. It was pretty easy to see changes in my brain over time. Nice pictures, too. I learned a lot about my treatment and disease progression over time.

A picture is worth 10,000 words. Five scans over 10 years is a treasure trove.

Visual patient-provider information exchanges can be aided by images. Self management and that by a caretaker can be aided by images. Memory can be enhanced with images. An understanding of the problem may be more easily achieved by family members and the patient when supported by images. This is a win-win-win-win situation.

The system I used for creating images to manage information allows me to manage myself better, relieve stress I put on caregivers, understand medical research better, and communicate with my doctors clearly. It primarily uses mind maps. Both neurologists have concluded that I use my techniques to compensate for some of my neurological (brain functioning) problems.

There are about 700 posts on this web site about issues in using mind maps, how to do it, my experiences, and “real” examples of using visual thinking methods as my cognitive functioning declined.

Oh … It should be noted I estimate that using visual methods of processing medical information for ONE YEAR are very inexpensive in comparison to ONE Emergency Room visit, ONE primary health care visit, ONE week of a patient’s period of acceptable cognitive functioning, ONE day of wasted homecare, ONE day out of work for a family caregiver. Now let’s multiply that by the number of Americans receiving healthcare through self pay or public insurance programs (Medicaid, Medicare, others) or private company managed health insurers.

Here’s another mind map about how the healthcare system might be made better (and less expensive) by incorporating health care information into mind maps and passing them around among patients, caregivers, family members, friends, physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals.

Click the image to expand the mind map.

When you have (or have a family member or a patient under your care has) a long-term medical or behavioral condition, it is important to monitor how the disease symptoms change over time.

Individualized treatment in dementia can consist of attempting to control the illness through medications and behavioral techniques to slow the progress of the disease. While in many cases the condition cannot be eliminated, often it can be slowed. There is no cure for dementia and very few medications have been demonstrated through clinical trials to work. The medications that work usually do so with only small changes in the functioning and quality of life and are only approved for Alzheimer’s Disease, only one of the conditions that are accompanied by dementia symptoms.

For a patient or healthcare professional, an important means of summarizing changes in medical and psychological functioning can be through a comprehensive mind map (or other visual display) summarizing the current status of symptoms of the disease. A huge benefit of documenting change over time is that it can “force” both the person with a disease and healthcare providers to view the condition in a wholistic way.

The visual display can also provide information useful suggestions for individualized behavioral and non-pharmaceutical interventions to help alleviate symptoms.

Click on the mind map to expand it.

Face it. You are going to age. You could have an accident and injure your brain. You might develop a brain condition due to disease or environmental toxicity.

Learn the mind mapping skills that can help preserve your memory and thinking processes. Learn it as early in your life as possible. Develop mind maps about your life experiences. Save the copies and computer app setups should you have cognitive decline and wish to reference them.

A visual journal-diary is a great thing to have.

Click the mind map to expand it.

Mind maps and related methods can help you use visual thinking to fight against cognitive decline and dementia. These methods can also help you maintain physical and mental health by maintaining control, making good decisions, remembering key information, and planning. Or, maintaining self-sufficiency, control, and independence so as to retain an acceptable quality of life.

Click on the mind map to expand it.

 

CLICK HERE to open another window showing all of the posts to date (more than 20 are expected) in this series on The Great Visual Thinking Machine.

#TGVTM #TheGreatVisualThinkingMachine #MindMap #CognitiveDecline

#Aging #NormalAging #TypicalAging #Alzheimers

This is post is part of a projected series of at least 20 posts. Searching for any of the keywords given above in the search box for this site will list all of the tweets in this series. The search box is located in the upper left corner of each post. The most accurate search should come from TGVTM or #TGVTM.

In the three prior posts (Prologue, Part 1, Part 2) I have discussed a general model of cognitive information processing for improving thinking. It is my belief that the model can be used by adults with typical patterns of aging as well as those with cognitive impairment and dementia. The model is characterized by several major features. These are

  1. a large percentage of the input and process and outcome information are in visual form;
  2. the model uses a unique blend of methods of processing combinations of primarily visual materials.

I call the model The Great Visual Thinking Machine™. The acronym is TGVTM™. The TGVTM is not a physical machine like a computer or automobile. Rather it a combination of procedures and knowledge as well as computer and commonsense algorithms that allow you to easily process large amounts of visual and verbal information. The key to the TGVTM is a way of using “pictures” to organize information, thoughts, and the results of processes. It can aid in better understanding related information, coding complex information into high-information images, an advanced way of increasing the likelihood that the information can be retrieved. The intent of the TGVTM is to produce generally better overall thinking.

Click on the images to expand them.

Click on the images to expand them.

 

 

CLICK HERE to open another window showing all of the posts to date (more than 20 are expected) in this series on The Great Visual Thinking Machine.

#TGVTM #TheGreatVisualThinkingMachine #MindMap #CognitiveDecline

#Aging #NormalAging #TypicalAging #Alzheimers

This is post is part of a projected series of at least 20 posts. Searching for any of the keywords given above in the search box for this site will list all of the tweets in this series. The search box is located in the upper left corner of each post. The most accurate search should come from TGVTM or #TGVTM.

In the two prior posts (Prologue, Part 1) I have discussed a model for a general model of cognitive information process for improving thinking It is my belief that the model can be used by adults with typical patterns of aging as well as those with cognitive impairment and dementia. The model is characterized by several major features. These are

  1. a large percentage of the information input and process and outcome information are in visual form;
  2. the model uses a unique blend of methods of processing combinations of primarily visual materials.

I call the model The Great Visual Thinking Machine™. The acronym is TGVTM™. The TGVTM is not a physical machine like a computer or automobile. Rather it a combination of procedures and knowledge as well as computer and commonsense algorithms that allow you to easily process large amounts of visual and verbal information. The key to the TGVTM is a way of using “pictures” to organize information, thoughts, and the results of processes. It can aid in better understanding related information, coding complex information into high-information images, an advanced way of increasing the likelihood that the information can be retrieved. The intent of the TGVTM is to produce generally better overall thinking.

Some examples that you might want to consider to visualize my concept are:

  1. the laboratory of Dr. Emmet Brown in the movies Back to the Future I, II, and II;
  2. the chocolate factory of Willy Wonka in the film Charlie and the Chocolate Factory;
  3. and — of course — the machines built by Cyberdyne Systems for Skynet which then produced the machines in The Terminator and its numerous sequels;
  4. and the last but the best analogy is the programs, environment, and thought processes of the characters living inside The Matrix I, II, and III. Plug Neo, Trinity, and Morpheus into the Matrix and watch their information process become almost entirely visual as they battle Agent Jones and Agent Brown.

The following mind map summarizes some of my visual thinking about The Great Visual Thinking Machine and is procedures and processes.

Who benefits from using TGVTM? Originally I developed it for adults to compensate for Cognitive impairment and Dementia (in many of various forms). Then I considered adults with typical aging processes and believe that it is just as relevant for them, especially if they want to have tools for combatting cognitive decline and disorders. So, every adult.

My conception of TGVTM was partially derived from Tony Buzan’s work on mind mapping; research and theory by J. Singer, J. Antrobus, and G. Huba on daydreaming; research and theory R Gardner, D. Jackson, and S. Messick as well as H. Witkin in individual differences in cognitive process and their relationship to personality and intelligence; R. Sternberg on cognition and intelligence; M. Rohde on sketchnoting and doodling; and S. Brown’s seminal publication on doodling. My ideas about how to implement TGVTM were heavily influenced by C. Griffiths monumental work on the program iMindMap expanding and computerizing Buzan’s theories of mind mapping). Of course, research and writings of dozens of others have also influenced in many different ways.

Oh, one other significant fact. I developed my entire theory and procedures between 2010 and the present (now 2019) during a period when I had cognitive impairment and dementia (of a type which is not Alzheimer’s Disease but rather a type of frontotemporal lobar degeneration) I started with a knowledge. The work started with ideas I had developed since the release of the computer program MindManager 2 a decade earlier and my experimentation with it and later versions.

As to the proof that The Great Visual Thinking Machine works, they are limited to the development of the method to personally assist me while having dementia and trying to lead a productive and full life with the condition. However before you run away muttering I’m nutz or live in a state where marijuana is legal,, consider the objective indices I would use to support the positive effects of The Great Visual Thinking Machine on me. Between 2012 and now (early 2919), I have built a following of about 135,000 on Twitter. I have about 5,000 additional followers on other social media platforms (Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest).  I wrote a well-reviewed book. I appear on many top 10, 25, or 100 lists of social media experts-influencers. I do my laundry, remember the places I loved most for vacations, have organized memories of everything from favorite movies and Allman Brothers songs to special moments and sporting events and concerts I went to. I’ve analyzed many daily-life decisions and their impacts for me and my family. Without the TGVTM I’ don’t believe I would have accomplished any of this, and the next post will explain why.

Click the images to expand them.

tgvtm™

CLICK HERE to open another window showing all of the posts to date (more than 20 are expected) in this series on The Great Visual Thinking Machine.

The Great Visual Thinking Machine is a set of visual thinking procedures that help one collect new information (especially VISUAL information), remember and recall information, and plan, schedule, and make comparative judgments.

97% of all the topics discussed within 813 posts in this blog (Hubaisms.com) since 2012 have used my evolving vision of The Great Visual Thinking Machine™ or TGVTM™.

I developed this model between 2012 and now (early 2019). During that time I have had dementia.  Think about that. Now, think about that again. None of my blog posts has been written with anyone else, edited by anyone else, or “approved” by anyone else. The key part of the blog posts — the complicated mind maps and other visual material were similarly developed by me with no directions, information, or revisions by others.

Using methods embedded as parts of The Great Visual Thinking Machine” did not keep my brain from continuing to degenerate in the frontal and temporal lobes. This is clearly demonstrated in my most recent MRI and PET scans I reviewed with my primary neurologist last week. I personally NEVER expected that using methods of thinking that were visually-oriented would either heal my brain or slow its overall physical degeneration.

But, I did hope that maybe an enhanced ability to think in an effective and accurate way using would slow the decline of my quality of life. Could I do that? I hoped for such an outcome as a result of learning and using new methods of visual thinking and I think that I achieved it FOR ME. Would this work for you? I don’t know. There have been no gold standard random assignment clinical trials. In fact, while much research needs to be done, this blog illustrates over six years that I was able to retain significant parts of my overall cognitive processing levels.

The Great Visual Thinking Machine includes cognitive and behavioral skill building, not medical, psychological, or other forms of professional treatment or therapy. Collectively the methods are super-charged ways for taking notes and comparing options The methods include encoding and decoding information in visual ways so as improve memory. These techniques can super-charge virtually all aspects of cognitive processing.

One reason I decided to make posts to the blog every few days was that I wanted to document my level of using my brain and new technologies over a period of years. I have done so and you can easily compare the results from 2012 through the present online here.

The diagram below is a depiction of The Great Visual Thinking Machine. It is written in the way that I use visual thinking methods to outline my thoughts and communicate them to others. The program used here is iMindMap, the premier way of making mind maps on computers. It is also the core of the major set of different visual thinking techniques that I use, typically in various combinations.

Click on the image to expand it.

The next mind map shows the potential users of The Great Visual Thinking Machine.

This post is the start of a series that explain how to use components of The Great Visual Thinking Machine. I expect to make a new post in this series every 1-2 days.

#TGVTM #TheGreatVisualThinkingMachine

#MindMap #VisualThinking #MindModel

tgvtm™

There are many ways mind maps can be customized including images and fonts and colors and size. Judicious use of these factors can produce a pretty mind map but not necessarily a compelling one.

Compelling mind maps present information effectively, promote creative thinking and the development of solutions, communicate well, and aid in memory.

There are many ways good design can be used so that effective and compelling mind maps result. Here is how I rate the importance of various features that can be customized in the most flexible mind mapping program — iMindMap. Click here to see my review of the most recent Version 11.

I looked at this application when it first came out a couple of years ago.

It has improved significantly.

This is easier to use than my favorite program iMindMap. It is also a lot less expensive.

[Do not confuse this app with Xmind 8, which is the more complete but harder to use version. Xmind 8 is much more expensive. Xmind ZEN produces more attractive maps and works MUCH better on small screens (mobile phone, pads).]

I will continue to use iMindMap 11 because of its status as the very best mind mapping app and I use all of its features. If you do not need all of the fancy options, this is a very good program for a beginner (and expert).

Click on the mind map to expand it.

Xmind ZEN

The “data” of mind maps are ideas. The map itself is a tool to support the manipulation and process of idea processing, idea communication, and idea use. The map organizes ideas and provides a means of showing their places within a hierarchical display. New theories or applications or insights can result from placing ideas into the mind mapping tool.

Come up some ideas by yourself or in a brainstorming group or by examing the previous ideas of others through reading books and research journals and interviewing observers of the idea development or use. Take the ideas you generate and collect and put them into the form of a mind map, whether computer-assisted or hand drawn.

Then the magic happens and you see how all of the ideas relate to one another.

The mind map below illustrates how a mind map helps to explore and understand ideas.

Click on the mind map to expand its size.

How Mind Mapping Supports Better Idea Processing, Ideal Communication, and Idea Use

I have been writing a lot on this blog about apathy during the past months. It has been an increasing annoyance and in some ways debilitating symptom. Where is the off switch? I’ve been looking for it for a long time. I cannot find a personal way within my control to turn apathy on and off, even though I do cycle through periods of greater and less apathy all week, often during the same day.

Help.

A mind map shown below discusses my dilemma. Click on the image to expand it.

my brain with dementia apathy condition

 

Click here for other posts on apathy.

It’s the elephant in the room.

elephant small

This is my review of the iMindMap application, Version 11. Since I started reviewing programs for creating mind maps, I have always rated iMindMap as the best of the lot. I have further gone on to say that iMindMap is the best application I own for promoting, improving, motivating, and perfecting visual thinking. With this version, iMindMap continues to evolve while it retains its position as the leader in mind mapping software.

In a way, iMindMap is no longer a mind mapping program in a narrow way. Rather it is the very best program for creating mind maps of any I have ever used. But, in addition to being the best mind mapping program, it contains 6 additional integrated modules that make it into the best integrated visual thinking product on the market.

What is a VIsual THinking ENvironment (VITHEN)? Click here to find out.

The most important way that iMindMap transcends a traditional mind map is that the tools provided for mind mapping almost automatically push you into thinking about your topic in a more sophisticated and complete way. It promotes better classifications of ideas, priorities, impact, outcomes, mediating steps, and theories in a way that is so intuitive it is almost like magic. That is, what you know about mind mapping and how to use it effectively, will automatically “in the background” evolve to an even higher level of visual thinking.

The iMindMap program includes a total of 7 interrelated modules that can be used in combination to understand ideas and produce documents that easily communicate your findings. The iMindMap program also includes dozens of tools and techniques that extend the usefulness of the programs.

While the Mind Map module is the central focus and will be the entry point for almost all, other modules supplement input, idea presentation, and specialized applications. It is the overall interaction of these modules that create the thinking environment.

My position is that mind maps are a powerful tool for creating, clarifying, and presenting THOUGHTS. So, I’ve always presented my reviews as mind maps in the past. I continue that tradition here.

Please click on the image to increase its size and see a classification and evaluation of the overall thinking environment including the best mind mapping module available.

This program is a brilliantly conceived thinking system and environment. While the app will continue to evolve over time as it has annually since the beginning of the century through tweaks to current procedures and new breakthroughs, iMindMap as it currently exists is the premier product for supporting innovative and creative thinking and communication.

Several more points.

  1. I strongly believe that the iMindMap program will help promote better quality thinking for most of those of all ages over 12.
  2. I also strongly believe that mind maps and visual thinking environments will be extremely useful for at least some individuals with declining cognitive skills, especially if they start mind mapping before the onset of cognitive decline or during early stages. I base that conclusion on my own experience in using this program and others to extend the period of minimal cognitive decline that occurs during a neurological disease, as a consequence of trauma, or other myriad problems. I have neurological disease and dementia.
  3. When I first started mind mapping using iMindMap, I was in an early-mid stage of dementia. My early reviews of the program (more than 5 years ago) took me approximately 2-4 hours to mind map and write the accompanying text. In later years, it took more time over more days. I spent at least 8-12 hours working on the mind map here and writing this review over more than a month. The production of the review was slowed down by my own feelings of not having energy and feeling apathy to various degrees. BUT, I was still able to produce a full review of comparable quality to my own reviews of the past after so many years have passed. That is a better outcome than I had expected when I started in 2010. All of the blog posts I have made and all of the mind maps I have developed over the years occurred when I was in cognitive decline and all are on this blog site. The timeline on the left of each web page will allow you to compare the mind maps I could produce years ago with those I now produce. All current mind maps since July 2018 were developed with iMindMap 11.
  4. Over the years I have used virtually all of the competing mind map products both on the Mac and on an iPad. I could not have developed my own mind maps with the other programs and achieved the same outcomes.
  5. While everybody hopes that the software they need to use is provided for free, iMindMap is far beyond any free or low-cost software. It is also as suitable a way to learn mind mapping for the first time as it is as a professional tool. I see the programs current pricing as appropriate for the high value of the thinking environment.
  6. This review used the Mac version of iMindMap 11.

What I have been achieving with mind maps during cognitive decline? Click here for more information.

To access all of my prior reviews of iMindMap (since Version 3), click here.

 

Now that’s a cryptic title for a blog post, isn’t it?

When you move into later stages in dementia, there are some additional challenges to deal with.

  • Apathy (A) like you have never felt apathy before.
  • Anxiety Avoidance (A+A) where the primary experience is often trying to stay away from events, people, and situations that cause you anxiety, to a large part because the experience of anxiety gets harder and harder to cope with.
  • The Bursting Bubble (B+B) phenomenon wherein strategies you have used successfully in earlier stages of dementia to maintain quality of life no longer work so well.
  • Confusion (C) as a daily part of everything you do increases 10-fold.
  • Communication (C) becomes less automatic, more idiosyncratic to you, much harder because words disappear on the way in and on the way out, slower, ambiguous, more frustrating to you and those you are communicating with, and possibly without any memory of things you said 5 minutes, 5 hours, 5 days, or last Thanksgiving.
  • A(A+A)(B+B)CC

Sounds like a recipe for disaster to me unless you take active (and hard) steps to maintain quality of life under different conditions you have encountered before.

The following mind map shows the problems involved with moving into later stages of dementia and some solutions that might work for you. Skills and techniques you learned at early and middle stages of dementia will be helpful but not sufficient to fully deal with the continuing challenges of maintaining quality of life.

Can it be done? Yes. Is it easy without a plan? No. Does a plan help? Yes.

Here are some explanations of what might be happening to you (or an individual under your care) as dementia progresses. Click on the image to expand it.

A few solutions for each problem are also suggested. Note that these are general suggestions and NOT medical or psychological advice. For more help, see your healthcare provider(s).

The A(A+A)(B+B)CCs of Later Stages in Dementia

 

 

Exclusive news flash … the contents of an iTunes playlist on Putin’s iPhone.

Since most Americans, including the one residing in the White House, know little about Russia’s history, here is a tutorial that can be played on Fox News so that POTUS will see it. The tutorial is easy to understand while eating Big Macs and does not require reading skills beyond those acquired by the age of 10.

A lot of Americans think Paul McCartney wrote this new Russian National Anthem. They are mistaken, but the Beatles song is a lot more catchy than that of the USSR. Putin loves it.

Russian National Anthem as revised under the regime of Vladimir Putin. An alternate Russian national anthem was used during the regime of Boris Yeltsin; Putin restored the original USSR national anthem in 2000 with lyric edits after replacing Democracy with Oligarchy.

I have no idea why Youtube has this labeled as the German Anthem.

Vladimir Putin sings the national anthem surrounded by 130,000 disenfranchised citizens of Russia. At least he seems to be able to sing his national anthem better than Roseanne Barr can sing ours.

Hopefully, after November 6, 2018, the anthem of the Soviet Union (AKA Russia) with edited lyrics will not replace the Star Spangled Banner.

As a point of comparison to Putin, click here to see some infamous performance of the USA national anthem.

November 6, 2018 ===> VOTE AGAINST RUSSIAN TROLLS

 

A few years ago, I introduced the term VIsual THinking ENvironment to describe applications that provide a number of visual thinking tools like mind maps, concept maps, flow charts, diagramming, statistical graphics, and visual representations of models, theories, and new knowledge in an integrated way within a single application.

As I used and experimented with new (or newly revised) mind mapping applications every year, I noticed how they were evolving from mind mapping to thinking environments by continuing to implement new and easier ways to process diagrams, figures, photography, sketches, doodles, and logic models together and build integration among tools that permit input visualization and visual output.

The best (and right now the only) evolving mind mapping application to include related new or adapted visual information processing methods is iMindMap 11. It is the only application that provides a well-conceived suite of techniques to form a Visual Thinking Environment (VITHEN). I believe that iMindMap should be rated A++ as a mind mapping program and A as an evolving VITHEN. I fully expect the entire iMindMap 11 suite to be as useful and developed as the mind mapping module within an iteration or three.

So, what is a VITHEN? The following mind map (created in iMindMap 11) incorporates my definition. A fully developed VITHEN not only will produce mind maps and other graphics but most importantly encourages intelligent use in model and theory building and optimizing creativity and effective knowledge development and presentation.

Click on the image to expand it.

What is a Visual Thinking Environment or VITHEN

The next posts include a “formal review” of iMindMap 11, examples of advanced mind maps (which I characterize as MIND MODELS), and an analysis of advantages of a VIsual THinking ENvironment over traditional mind mapping and other graphic thinking tools.

Click here for a full review of iMindMap, Version 11.
Review posted 10-28-18.

Want your dementia care and final life experiences to be good ones? Take a series of “final stands” where you continue to express what you want. Your friends, family members, caregivers, and healthcare providers cannot read your mind. Try to communicate with them through written words, conversations, or visual diagrams.

Before dementia becomes too advanced you need to make some decisions about how you wish to be treated as your cognitive, emotional, and social skills get worse. And you need to make sure that those who care for you, help you, and are important parts of your life know what you want.

I’ve shown a few topics you might want to consider along with your family, friends, caregivers, and healthcare providers in the mind model (map) below.

Click on the image to expand it.

Do your homework and express what you hope to experience and achieve in the final stages of your dementia. Even as dementia causes increasing problems, you can still enjoy life and lead one of high quality.

Plan, enjoy, communicate, live a high quality of end-of-life experiences, and work to achieve your goals with others. Stay as independent as you can, be nice, cooperate, negotiate, and plan.

 

Early Friday morning Hurricane Florence is going right over my house. The predicted storm center path this for Category 4 hurricane (150 mph) is directly over my town near Raleigh, North Carolina. Expected rainfall is between 10 and 20 inches. Some areas will get 48 inches.

About one year ago, Hurricane Maria went over Puerto Rico, a part of the United States. All the lights went out. All of them. Most of the island was destroyed. And there was no fresh, safe water.

A few days after the storm President Trump announced that 65 people had died. The US government and especially President Trump still cites that number as evidence he does “the best job in the history of the United States” in disaster relief.

Independent studies by two major university Departments of Public Health have shown that 3,000 US citizens in Puerto Rico died. One year later (an hour ago), President Trump continues to tweet that his relief efforts in Puerto Rico were about perfect. The statistics of that relief effort shows that the aftermath of Hurricane Maria was one of the most incompetent relief efforts in USA history.

Just watch the video. And consider that parts of Puerto Rico do not have drinkable water or electricity after a year. And people were drinking drain water from a nuclear waste site for months in Puerto Rico.

I know I will be OK. President Trump says so.

[This morning, the computer predicted path models for the eye of the storm have been revised. The hurricane might go somewhat south of my home, although the path is still quite unpredictable. But there is no victory in that. The new predicted path has the storm going over two major US cities: Atlanta, Georgia, and Charlotte, North Carolina. Death tolls could be event high if the path changes.]

I know I will be OK. President Trump says so.

Trump

I know I will be OK. President Trump says so.

Trump