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social, health, political imagery through the lens of George J Huba PhD © 2012-2019

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Question: Which groups of people are not doing their jobs by trying in a meaningful way to eliminate foreign influences on our elections?

 

Answer: Circle all answers which apply.

A) US Senate

B) US House of Representatives

C) President of the United States and White House Staff

D) Secretaries of Relevant US Government Departments

E) All of the Above

 

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p dir=”auto”>Time to demand that the bozos you identified above are told by the US public to stop sitting on their backsides (and cashing the checks foreign influences are providing to some to promote their own careers and line their own pockets).

 

Let’s call this one like it is.

A long-standing policy of the United States has been to support non-violent demonstrators against repressive, non—democratic foreign governments who violate human rights.

No longer. The USA has declined to support movements in China and Russia (currently in progress).

Wake Trump up. An important part of the POTUS job is to support world-wide democracy and human rights.

What the ….. is he thinking? [Yeah, I know … profits before human rights.]

 

 

June 2 until July 12. That’s a long time for any person. It’s a much longer time for a person with cognitive decline. It is the longest time between posts on Hubaisms.com.

Typically, if you got back through my 800 posts since 2012, you will find that on average the gap between consecutive posts is about 3 days with flurries of activity when I post several times per day.

Why the big gap for the first time? Here are some of the reasons.

  • 11 fantastic days in Spain (Barcelona, Majorca, and Madrid) with wonderful food, great museums, and immersion in another culture
  • family matters
  • working on a book
  • preventive activities on my part and that of my medical providers against the rate of increasing cognitive decline
  • feeling kind of lazy
  • “malfunctioning” of my personal clock (consistent organization of daily schedules)
  • video bingeing on The Expanse, Salvation, and Marvel Universe movies (all highly recommended)
  • working on some new methods of using visual thinking (see next post) to deal with cognitive decline

Here are some of the consequences of the “absent six weeks.”

  • very rusty on WordPress (blogging software)
  • very rusty on using the iMindMap program and others for computerized mind mapping
  • development of some new techniques and variants of old techniques for fighting cognitive decline and improve some of the methods I have been using

During the six week break I did conclude that my life is slowing down and it is getting harder, never easier, to keep a definite “work” routine going. Given that I was in a consistent and fairly invariant pattern of work and other activities, “relaxing” from that set routine has defiitely made it harder to re-establish the patterns that have been keeping me stable over the past eight years. Keeping on a regular schedule of cognitive exercise has been important for me over almost a decade. Time to get back on a regulated at the schedule. At the same time, I am going to try to get other things back to normal and establish

In the next few weeks, I will be posting a lot on mind mapping, improved techniques for effective visual thinking, experiences during my cognitive decline, and new ways to document your daily life (throughout your lifespan and during cognitive decline).

Woo-Hoo!!!

Time for my vacation to end.

 

 

I use Grammarly with my blog and social media posts as well as everything else I type to check spelling and grammar. Grammarly works well with both USAish, UKish, and the English of the rest of the world.

Grammarly is an advanced editor that is extremely that catches most spelling errors and surprises me all of the time with its excellent grammar suggestions

Grammarly works well in virtually all programs I use such as WordPress, Twitter, Facebook, note editors, email, and many other apps.

Donald Trump should acquire copies for his own unsecured cell phone tweets and his speech writer. After all, what is an inane idea with spelling errors?. This problem is probably also driving the Russians and Chinese crazy, especially if they are trying to use Google Translate..

I think it a fantastic time of year for most of the things I like to do in spite of the inevitable 5:15 PM thunderstorms and the usual 5-10 days of 99 degree temperatures.

Row a boat, paddle a canoe, work on your paddle tennis game, walk in the sand of many bodies of water, drop an ice cream cone, and cheer at the baseball park. Take a vacation even if your travels are limited to local pools and nearby state and national parks. Go watch a little league game and take some pictures. Have a picnic. And never get frustrated by the amount of sweat you produce.

Although there is no account of the season in which G-d created the universe within the Torah, Koran, or Old Testament, it strikes me that summer is a most glorious achievement. I conclude it must have been the first season.

The joys of summer. Click on the mind map to expand it.

Think about entering the healthcare system as a patient. You get handed 5 pages of tiny font sheets to fill in with your address, person paying the bills, the medical history of yourself and two generations back every time you go in, You scribble out answers into tiny boxes and hand the forms back. Then they give you 3 small-font pages of legal disclaimers and conditions to read and approve.

Next a nurse takes you aside for a blood pressure reading, a weight assessment, and various other information. He scribbles all of the resuolts into a chart.

Next up the doctor enters. She scans all of the paper you filled out and what the nurse wrote down, and then starts asking you questions in a shotgun approach. When you comment that the answer is still what you wrote down 5 minutes earlier, she is not impressed.

Later the doctor gives you instructions. She goes fast but alo types the suggestions into an EMR (electronic medical record). You may lose the form (common with the cognitive diagnoses I have), not understand everything in the report, and not be able to read 2 point text. but at least you can recover what she wrote.

Don’t they always say a picture is worth 1,000 words? Don’t most people agree with that statement?

For the current aging birth cohort (boomers), images are a way of life. Photos were available when we were born and financially accessible to most by the mid-1960s. The number of pictures increased in newspapers and later on the Internet over the past 50 years. Immediate images and videos from the ubiquitous smartphones have been available to the majority of world-wide families for the past 5 years.

Home black and white television sets became very common in the 1950s and color televisions in the late 1960s.. By the 1990 many US homes had more than one television set. In the 2000s screen (flat panel) sizes at least doubled in size in most homes. 700 channels and 3 TV sets and and nothing on.

We all use images constantly and reading text is going down. We primarily get our news from pictures on the Internet, in print media, and shared with friends or on social media. Pictures are used to influence our attitudes, behaviors, preferences, and to sell us products.

I have been working hard at creating and using images in my own healthcare for the past 9 years after I was diagnosed with a progressive neurocognitive disorder.

About six months ago I had a PET scan of my brain as well as my fourth MRI since 2010. I now have two neurologists. The secondary one (a cognitive neurologist who ordered the scans) emailed me a one page written report wit the results. No images were shown on that report. At my following appointment she discussed the report with me. She commented that there were no images to see. I then asked her if she was going to correct the conceptual typo in the report. In the first summary paragraph of the report it said that my PET scan was normal; the remaining two-thirds of the report gave numbers that indicated portions of my brain were not functioning well. Then the first paragraph was repeated at the end but this time the summary was identical in all but one word which said that my scans indicated significant problems. The doctor sent an email to medical transcription while I was there pointing out the problem.

I asked to see the scan and was told that there was nothing for me to see. I was more than a little surprised by that (well a lot surprised!). I had thought that it would be cool to see which parts of my brain were goners and which were lighting up.

A month later I saw my primary neurologist who has been in charge of my care for more than 9 years. I asked her if she had read the report on my PET scan and last MRI. I explained that I was really surprised that the other neurologist told me that there was nothing for me to see. So she then went to her large clinical display, called up my file and showed me sequential MRI and PET scans. It was pretty easy to see changes in my brain over time. Nice pictures, too. I learned a lot about my treatment and disease progression over time.

A picture is worth 10,000 words. Five scans over 10 years is a treasure trove.

Visual patient-provider information exchanges can be aided by images. Self management and that by a caretaker can be aided by images. Memory can be enhanced with images. An understanding of the problem may be more easily achieved by family members and the patient when supported by images. This is a win-win-win-win situation.

The system I used for creating images to manage information allows me to manage myself better, relieve stress I put on caregivers, understand medical research better, and communicate with my doctors clearly. It primarily uses mind maps. Both neurologists have concluded that I use my techniques to compensate for some of my neurological (brain functioning) problems.

There are about 700 posts on this web site about issues in using mind maps, how to do it, my experiences, and “real” examples of using visual thinking methods as my cognitive functioning declined.

Oh … It should be noted I estimate that using visual methods of processing medical information for ONE YEAR are very inexpensive in comparison to ONE Emergency Room visit, ONE primary health care visit, ONE week of a patient’s period of acceptable cognitive functioning, ONE day of wasted homecare, ONE day out of work for a family caregiver. Now let’s multiply that by the number of Americans receiving healthcare through self pay or public insurance programs (Medicaid, Medicare, others) or private company managed health insurers.

Here’s another mind map about how the healthcare system might be made better (and less expensive) by incorporating health care information into mind maps and passing them around among patients, caregivers, family members, friends, physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals.

Click the image to expand the mind map.

When you have (or have a family member or a patient under your care has) a long-term medical or behavioral condition, it is important to monitor how the disease symptoms change over time.

Individualized treatment in dementia can consist of attempting to control the illness through medications and behavioral techniques to slow the progress of the disease. While in many cases the condition cannot be eliminated, often it can be slowed. There is no cure for dementia and very few medications have been demonstrated through clinical trials to work. The medications that work usually do so with only small changes in the functioning and quality of life and are only approved for Alzheimer’s Disease, only one of the conditions that are accompanied by dementia symptoms.

For a patient or healthcare professional, an important means of summarizing changes in medical and psychological functioning can be through a comprehensive mind map (or other visual display) summarizing the current status of symptoms of the disease. A huge benefit of documenting change over time is that it can “force” both the person with a disease and healthcare providers to view the condition in a wholistic way.

The visual display can also provide information useful suggestions for individualized behavioral and non-pharmaceutical interventions to help alleviate symptoms.

Click on the mind map to expand it.

Face it. You are going to age. You could have an accident and injure your brain. You might develop a brain condition due to disease or environmental toxicity.

Learn the mind mapping skills that can help preserve your memory and thinking processes. Learn it as early in your life as possible. Develop mind maps about your life experiences. Save the copies and computer app setups should you have cognitive decline and wish to reference them.

A visual journal-diary is a great thing to have.

Click the mind map to expand it.

Mind maps and related methods can help you use visual thinking to fight against cognitive decline and dementia. These methods can also help you maintain physical and mental health by maintaining control, making good decisions, remembering key information, and planning. Or, maintaining self-sufficiency, control, and independence so as to retain an acceptable quality of life.

Click on the mind map to expand it.

 

CLICK HERE to open another window showing all of the posts to date (more than 20 are expected) in this series on The Great Visual Thinking Machine.

#TGVTM #TheGreatVisualThinkingMachine #MindMap #CognitiveDecline

#Aging #NormalAging #TypicalAging #Alzheimers

This is post is part of a projected series of at least 20 posts. Searching for any of the keywords given above in the search box for this site will list all of the tweets in this series. The search box is located in the upper left corner of each post. The most accurate search should come from TGVTM or #TGVTM.

In the three prior posts (Prologue, Part 1, Part 2) I have discussed a general model of cognitive information processing for improving thinking. It is my belief that the model can be used by adults with typical patterns of aging as well as those with cognitive impairment and dementia. The model is characterized by several major features. These are

  1. a large percentage of the input and process and outcome information are in visual form;
  2. the model uses a unique blend of methods of processing combinations of primarily visual materials.

I call the model The Great Visual Thinking Machine™. The acronym is TGVTM™. The TGVTM is not a physical machine like a computer or automobile. Rather it a combination of procedures and knowledge as well as computer and commonsense algorithms that allow you to easily process large amounts of visual and verbal information. The key to the TGVTM is a way of using “pictures” to organize information, thoughts, and the results of processes. It can aid in better understanding related information, coding complex information into high-information images, an advanced way of increasing the likelihood that the information can be retrieved. The intent of the TGVTM is to produce generally better overall thinking.

Click on the images to expand them.

Click on the images to expand them.

 

 

CLICK HERE to open another window showing all of the posts to date (more than 20 are expected) in this series on The Great Visual Thinking Machine.

#TGVTM #TheGreatVisualThinkingMachine #MindMap #CognitiveDecline

#Aging #NormalAging #TypicalAging #Alzheimers

This is post is part of a projected series of at least 20 posts. Searching for any of the keywords given above in the search box for this site will list all of the tweets in this series. The search box is located in the upper left corner of each post. The most accurate search should come from TGVTM or #TGVTM.

In the two prior posts (Prologue, Part 1) I have discussed a model for a general model of cognitive information process for improving thinking It is my belief that the model can be used by adults with typical patterns of aging as well as those with cognitive impairment and dementia. The model is characterized by several major features. These are

  1. a large percentage of the information input and process and outcome information are in visual form;
  2. the model uses a unique blend of methods of processing combinations of primarily visual materials.

I call the model The Great Visual Thinking Machine™. The acronym is TGVTM™. The TGVTM is not a physical machine like a computer or automobile. Rather it a combination of procedures and knowledge as well as computer and commonsense algorithms that allow you to easily process large amounts of visual and verbal information. The key to the TGVTM is a way of using “pictures” to organize information, thoughts, and the results of processes. It can aid in better understanding related information, coding complex information into high-information images, an advanced way of increasing the likelihood that the information can be retrieved. The intent of the TGVTM is to produce generally better overall thinking.

Some examples that you might want to consider to visualize my concept are:

  1. the laboratory of Dr. Emmet Brown in the movies Back to the Future I, II, and II;
  2. the chocolate factory of Willy Wonka in the film Charlie and the Chocolate Factory;
  3. and — of course — the machines built by Cyberdyne Systems for Skynet which then produced the machines in The Terminator and its numerous sequels;
  4. and the last but the best analogy is the programs, environment, and thought processes of the characters living inside The Matrix I, II, and III. Plug Neo, Trinity, and Morpheus into the Matrix and watch their information process become almost entirely visual as they battle Agent Jones and Agent Brown.

The following mind map summarizes some of my visual thinking about The Great Visual Thinking Machine and is procedures and processes.

Who benefits from using TGVTM? Originally I developed it for adults to compensate for Cognitive impairment and Dementia (in many of various forms). Then I considered adults with typical aging processes and believe that it is just as relevant for them, especially if they want to have tools for combatting cognitive decline and disorders. So, every adult.

My conception of TGVTM was partially derived from Tony Buzan’s work on mind mapping; research and theory by J. Singer, J. Antrobus, and G. Huba on daydreaming; research and theory R Gardner, D. Jackson, and S. Messick as well as H. Witkin in individual differences in cognitive process and their relationship to personality and intelligence; R. Sternberg on cognition and intelligence; M. Rohde on sketchnoting and doodling; and S. Brown’s seminal publication on doodling. My ideas about how to implement TGVTM were heavily influenced by C. Griffiths monumental work on the program iMindMap expanding and computerizing Buzan’s theories of mind mapping). Of course, research and writings of dozens of others have also influenced in many different ways.

Oh, one other significant fact. I developed my entire theory and procedures between 2010 and the present (now 2019) during a period when I had cognitive impairment and dementia (of a type which is not Alzheimer’s Disease but rather a type of frontotemporal lobar degeneration) I started with a knowledge. The work started with ideas I had developed since the release of the computer program MindManager 2 a decade earlier and my experimentation with it and later versions.

As to the proof that The Great Visual Thinking Machine works, they are limited to the development of the method to personally assist me while having dementia and trying to lead a productive and full life with the condition. However before you run away muttering I’m nutz or live in a state where marijuana is legal,, consider the objective indices I would use to support the positive effects of The Great Visual Thinking Machine on me. Between 2012 and now (early 2919), I have built a following of about 135,000 on Twitter. I have about 5,000 additional followers on other social media platforms (Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest).  I wrote a well-reviewed book. I appear on many top 10, 25, or 100 lists of social media experts-influencers. I do my laundry, remember the places I loved most for vacations, have organized memories of everything from favorite movies and Allman Brothers songs to special moments and sporting events and concerts I went to. I’ve analyzed many daily-life decisions and their impacts for me and my family. Without the TGVTM I’ don’t believe I would have accomplished any of this, and the next post will explain why.

Click the images to expand them.

tgvtm™

CLICK HERE to open another window showing all of the posts to date (more than 20 are expected) in this series on The Great Visual Thinking Machine.

The Great Visual Thinking Machine is a set of visual thinking procedures that help one collect new information (especially VISUAL information), remember and recall information, and plan, schedule, and make comparative judgments.

97% of all the topics discussed within 813 posts in this blog (Hubaisms.com) since 2012 have used my evolving vision of The Great Visual Thinking Machine™ or TGVTM™.

I developed this model between 2012 and now (early 2019). During that time I have had dementia.  Think about that. Now, think about that again. None of my blog posts has been written with anyone else, edited by anyone else, or “approved” by anyone else. The key part of the blog posts — the complicated mind maps and other visual material were similarly developed by me with no directions, information, or revisions by others.

Using methods embedded as parts of The Great Visual Thinking Machine” did not keep my brain from continuing to degenerate in the frontal and temporal lobes. This is clearly demonstrated in my most recent MRI and PET scans I reviewed with my primary neurologist last week. I personally NEVER expected that using methods of thinking that were visually-oriented would either heal my brain or slow its overall physical degeneration.

But, I did hope that maybe an enhanced ability to think in an effective and accurate way using would slow the decline of my quality of life. Could I do that? I hoped for such an outcome as a result of learning and using new methods of visual thinking and I think that I achieved it FOR ME. Would this work for you? I don’t know. There have been no gold standard random assignment clinical trials. In fact, while much research needs to be done, this blog illustrates over six years that I was able to retain significant parts of my overall cognitive processing levels.

The Great Visual Thinking Machine includes cognitive and behavioral skill building, not medical, psychological, or other forms of professional treatment or therapy. Collectively the methods are super-charged ways for taking notes and comparing options The methods include encoding and decoding information in visual ways so as improve memory. These techniques can super-charge virtually all aspects of cognitive processing.

One reason I decided to make posts to the blog every few days was that I wanted to document my level of using my brain and new technologies over a period of years. I have done so and you can easily compare the results from 2012 through the present online here.

The diagram below is a depiction of The Great Visual Thinking Machine. It is written in the way that I use visual thinking methods to outline my thoughts and communicate them to others. The program used here is iMindMap, the premier way of making mind maps on computers. It is also the core of the major set of different visual thinking techniques that I use, typically in various combinations.

Click on the image to expand it.

The next mind map shows the potential users of The Great Visual Thinking Machine.

This post is the start of a series that explain how to use components of The Great Visual Thinking Machine. I expect to make a new post in this series every 1-2 days.

#TGVTM #TheGreatVisualThinkingMachine

#MindMap #VisualThinking #MindModel

tgvtm™

There are many ways mind maps can be customized including images and fonts and colors and size. Judicious use of these factors can produce a pretty mind map but not necessarily a compelling one.

Compelling mind maps present information effectively, promote creative thinking and the development of solutions, communicate well, and aid in memory.

There are many ways good design can be used so that effective and compelling mind maps result. Here is how I rate the importance of various features that can be customized in the most flexible mind mapping program — iMindMap. Click here to see my review of the most recent Version 11.

I looked at this application when it first came out a couple of years ago.

It has improved significantly.

This is easier to use than my favorite program iMindMap. It is also a lot less expensive.

[Do not confuse this app with Xmind 8, which is the more complete but harder to use version. Xmind 8 is much more expensive. Xmind ZEN produces more attractive maps and works MUCH better on small screens (mobile phone, pads).]

I will continue to use iMindMap 11 because of its status as the very best mind mapping app and I use all of its features. If you do not need all of the fancy options, this is a very good program for a beginner (and expert).

Click on the mind map to expand it.

Xmind ZEN

The “data” of mind maps are ideas. The map itself is a tool to support the manipulation and process of idea processing, idea communication, and idea use. The map organizes ideas and provides a means of showing their places within a hierarchical display. New theories or applications or insights can result from placing ideas into the mind mapping tool.

Come up some ideas by yourself or in a brainstorming group or by examing the previous ideas of others through reading books and research journals and interviewing observers of the idea development or use. Take the ideas you generate and collect and put them into the form of a mind map, whether computer-assisted or hand drawn.

Then the magic happens and you see how all of the ideas relate to one another.

The mind map below illustrates how a mind map helps to explore and understand ideas.

Click on the mind map to expand its size.

How Mind Mapping Supports Better Idea Processing, Ideal Communication, and Idea Use

I have been writing a lot on this blog about apathy during the past months. It has been an increasing annoyance and in some ways debilitating symptom. Where is the off switch? I’ve been looking for it for a long time. I cannot find a personal way within my control to turn apathy on and off, even though I do cycle through periods of greater and less apathy all week, often during the same day.

Help.

A mind map shown below discusses my dilemma. Click on the image to expand it.

my brain with dementia apathy condition

 

Click here for other posts on apathy.

It’s the elephant in the room.

elephant small